ROAD TO 225 BENCH

Enjoy the inherent narcissism in a sweet video featuring mediocre lifting.

Some of the clips are sped up to 3x speed (not to fool Celica that I’m moving quickly)

1st one which I failed to caption is a 315 high bar squat at 2 or 3x speed.

If you listen carefully you can hear my hot gf shouting encouragement.  Also during one of the lifts, she didn’t know the camera was recording, so she started getting changed.  Sorry about that (you must be 18+ to view)

Big WWI Dreadnought post coming soon.

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25 thoughts on “ROAD TO 225 BENCH

  1. Props on the BTN@160. Real old time strongman stuff there, close to BW. Squats look good too, it must be nerve racking to walk that 510 out.

  2. Seconding JaySun’s mirin of BWBTN. Also I have to disagree with hsilly on the high heavy partials. If nothing else, it gets you used to walking out the weight and existing with something that heavy on your back. Although I did read a somewhat convincing argument (dunno if it was from some westside guy or maybe even PC) but a lot of times people train the lock out because they think that’s their ‘weak spot’ but really they just don’t generate enough power out of the bottom, and so the lift stalls further up. Seems useful at first, but then you think about it and it’s only marginally more insightful than saying if you don’t want to miss lifts then just be strong. Ok, thanks, will try.

    • I’m kinda split on partials. On one hand, I agree with whoever said that about weak points and ranges of motion. You don’t fail in a certain part of the lift because you’re weak only in that particular position. The chance of you accurately replicating your full-range lift body positioning at partial height is close to zero. Doing reps in the “sticking point” range will probably only make you better at doing reps in that range (or mess up your joints), not stronger overall. This is why multiple reps with a significant weight tend to be much more productive than partial lifts.

      On the other hand, partials can be used to make certain muscles stronger (e.g. board presses for triceps, high squats for legs, box squats for heeeeup draaahve), which could, over time, make you better at the actual lift. “Full range” for particular exercises is not set in stone and you will often (if not always) have to modify said exercises to suit your individual leverages, if muscle building is the goal. Partial lifts can be very useful in this respect.

      • i think you’re both right, Quisp “walking it out and existing with heavy weight on your back” Fatman “certain muscles stronger”
        i’m trying to make my pussy stronger – when i go over a certain amount of weight it becomes a real weak point.

      • Klokov press gives you better side delt pump, though.

        But it is kind of hilarious, the idea of BTN anything making your shoulders’ tendons and ligaments all explode and you becoming shoulder crippled and snapping all your rotator cuffs up if you so much as dare to do anything behind the neck.

        • Depends on your leverages.

          Happy holidays everyone. I just saw that Coach’s 370 BP is ranked on the US “50 best raw lifts in 181 class” list. We are in the presence of greatness.

  3. I’ll put this out here, for all the internet to see.

    thinking about next years training and what changes I should make. currently, I do not actually follow wendler’s program to the letter (or hardly at all, if you look at the beyond 5/3/1 book). that might be something I should change, and as I’m reading this (http://www.powerliftingtowin.com/beyond-531/) I get somewhat interested in doing the 3/5/1 variation instead. the main purpose would, of course, be to avoid two somewhat heavy weeks after the other.

    I’ll read the ebook thoroughly before deciding anything, but I would greatly appreciate any input here.

      • i checked out your plan and it looks pretty good. The only thing is that I’ve never liked doing mil press before bench, or deadlifts before squats. But that’s really up to you i.e. one of those general principles that T-mag debunks every 3 months – and re-affirms every 4.

        I’m a big believer in gradually evolving training programs. IOW if you did 5/3/1, and liked it except for the ____, or are tired of the ____, or need to do more _____, it’s totally fine to change the _____’s, and generally better than just throwing it out the window.

        Also, you’re qualified to write your own training program – most people are. My first 30 or so programs were entirely too ambitious, so I had to scale them back after the first week – or the first workout, lol – but that’s just the kind of guy I (and a lot of people) am. But the only real training factors that matter is “are you making actual gains on the things that are important to you” and “can you stand to do it any more?” which usually go hand in hand. Wendler et al can’t know all the things that go into your decision-making process (flat bench hurts your elbow, your gym’s squat rack collapsed last tuesday, your gf wants to go jogging on the weekends, you are a professional mma fighter,etc) nor should they be expected to.

        in short it’s almost always better to change the program gradually (like you seem to be doing) rather than switching from 5/3/1 to Sheiko to Broz to Madcow every month (this is directed to others). But once in a while you do need to totally start over. I would give the rough guideline of a year for major program jumps, while OTOH changing the program minorly every week is fine (BTN for military press, i’m gonna workout T-TH-SUN instead of MWF, etc)

        let me see if i can get fatman to agree with all of my points here. he’s never done that before, and i’m pessimistic.

        • I agree,even though I’m not Fatman. I have gotten stellar results out of Madcow and being consistent and eating right and etc. I was thinking of changing up my squat progression, but have decided to use the holidays as a deload and focus on conditioning and BW exercises. Once I am back to a regular schedule, I’ll reset my maxes and begin anew. I have a buddy who is using 5/3/1 and it is working fine for him,but it suits his needs.

      • Seems good, but not sure about hitting 90% of your max (at least that’s what it looks like from the formulas), for multiple sets of 3, twice a week on each lift. Also deadlifts before (heavy) squats is a big no for me, but my deadlift sucks so what do I know.

        • OK, let’s see if I can agree with Coach 100%.

          “i checked out your plan and it looks pretty good.” – agreed.

          “The only thing is that I’ve never liked doing mil press before bench, or deadlifts before squats.” – agreed.

          “I’m a big believer in gradually evolving training programs.” – agreed.

          “But the only real training factors that matter is “are you making actual gains on the things that are important to you” and “can you stand to do it any more?” which usually go hand in hand.” – agreed.

          Wendler’s program was (understandably) aimed at guys with Wendler-like experience: fat and unconditioned, maybe strong but not strong enough to justify the attained level of fatness, with recurring injuries or chronically painful joints. Hence the huge focus on cardio and conditioning (for a strength program). These aren’t necessarily your circumstances and training history.

          “in short it’s almost always better to change the program gradually (like you seem to be doing) rather than switching from 5/3/1 to Sheiko to Broz to Madcow every month (this is directed to others).” – agreed.

          Program-hopping is worse than not following a program at all – a year spent lifting randomly and increasing weight when you can is more productive than a year spent doing the intro weeks of 20 different programs.

          “But once in a while you do need to totally start over. I would give the rough guideline of a year for major program jumps, while OTOH changing the program minorly every week is fine (BTN for military press, i’m gonna workout T-TH-SUN instead of MWF, etc)” – agreed.

          You need to spend at least six months on a program (IMO) before you can legitimately say whether it’s working or not. Small tweaks can (and should) happen more often. I guess that’s 100%.

          • “You need to spend at least six months on a program (IMO) before you can legitimately say whether it’s working or not. Small tweaks can (and should) happen more often. I guess that’s 100%.” – agreed too. Best piece of advice for anyone.

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